April 21, 2017
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An investigation by USA Today has documented more than 400 previously undisclosed properties across the U.S. owned by President Trump's business trust and companies. The properties are worth an estimated $250 million and include "at least 422 luxury condos and penthouses from New York City to Las Vegas, 12 mansion lots on bluffs overlooking his golf course on the Pacific Ocean, and dozens more smaller pieces of real estate," USA Today reported.

The properties present "an extraordinary and unprecedented potential for people, corporations, or foreign interests to try to influence the president," USA Today wrote. Because the properties in question are owned directly by Trump's companies and not licensed through a separate development company, any sales would directly augment Trump's wealth. Already, there are some murky deals: USA Today found that of the 14 luxury condos and home-building lots Trump companies have sold since Election Day, "half were sold to limited liability companies" and "no names were listed in deeds, obscuring buyers' identities."

Now that Trump has assumed office, a lot more people are apparently inquiring about buying real estate owned by the president. While Trump isn't legally obligated to offer a complete inventory of every property he owns, nor is he required to disclose when he makes a sale, he is constitutionally prohibited from accepting gifts from foreign officials. But because real estate laws allow shell companies to be set up so that a person can make a purchase without revealing his or her identity, USA Today noted it could be "impossible for the public to know" who purchases a Trump property in this manner.

"Anyone seeking to influence the president could set up an anonymous company and purchase his property," said Heather Lowe, director of government affairs at Global Financial Integrity, a group focused on stopping illegal financial transactions. "It's a big black box, and the system is failing as a check for conflicts of interest."

Read the full product of USA Today's four-month-long investigation here. Becca Stanek

1:10 a.m. ET

"Man, crazy s--t happens so fast in this presidency, sometimes it feels like I'm binge-watching it," Seth Meyers said on Monday's Late Night, trying to digest the weekend's news. "It's like, 'He's suing the porn star? Two hours ago he said he didn't even know her! Where's my Chinese food?'" He compared Trump's shifting story on whether he had a relationship with Stormy Daniels to Trump's shifting story on whether he has a relationship with Vladimir Putin, with a compelling video montage. And he briefly ran through Cambridge Analytica's harvesting of 50 million Facebook accounts, apparently to help Trump win — something Facebook has known about for two years.

But mostly Meyers focused on firing of former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, "an object of paranoid fixation for Trump," and Trump's attacks on Special Counsel Robert Mueller. Trump "has spent months trying to discredit McCabe because McCabe is a key witness in the Mueller investigation, specifically with regard to the firing of FBI Director James Comey — which is the central question when it comes to possible obstruction of justice charges," Meyers said. And like the Comey case, firing McCabe may backfire. "Trump is such an idiot — he keeps firing dudes who take meticulous notes," he said. "We don't know what's in those memos, nor do we know what Robert Mueller knows, but what we do know is that Trump's public behavior is very much the behavior of a guilty man."

Firing McCabe 26 hours before he can collect his pension — on his 50th birthday no less — seems "extra vindictive" on Trump's part, Trevor Noah said on The Daily Show. We don't know what happened, but Trump's behavior is definitely "suspicious," and it points to firing Mueller. "He's definitely considering it," Noah said. "You know how they say men thing about sex every 8 seconds? That's what Trump does with firing people. ... So Robert Mueller, I don't know when your next birthday is, but something tells me the president may be planning a surprise." Peter Weber

12:37 a.m. ET
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The suspected serial bomber targeting Austin, believed to have set up explosions that killed two people and injured five, is "showing that he's quite good," Austin Police Chief Brian Manley said Monday.

Since March 2, four bombs have gone off around the city — three were left on doorsteps, and one was triggered Sunday night when two men on their bicycles hit a trip wire; they were seriously injured, but are expected to survive. Due to similarities between the devices, it's believed that all four bombings are linked, and only a few hours before the fourth bomb went off, law enforcement officials pleaded with the bomber to give them a call. "We've opened ourselves up for a message, and that's why we asked him to contact us and gave him phone numbers for him to contact us at," Manley told CBS News.

Manley said he believes the person is "showing that he's quite good. This person is taunting law enforcement in the city, that he's one step ahead." Former counterterrorism agent Fred Burton told CBS News the suspect is likely watching the news to see what people are saying about the attacks, and "knows explosives," possibly learning while in the military. There are now 500 federal agents working the case in Austin, and officials are offering a reward of $115,000 for any information leading to the arrest and conviction of the suspect. Catherine Garcia

March 19, 2018
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The Weinstein Co. has filed for bankruptcy, the company announced Monday, after dozens of women accused co-founder Harvey Weinstein of sexual misconduct and harassment.

Several women came forward last fall with their allegations of abuse against Weinstein, at the time one of the most powerful producers in Hollywood, and as more and more accusations were made, the company couldn't stay afloat. Earlier this month, a group of investors announced they made a deal to buy the Weinstein Co., but that collapsed after it was determined the company had more debt than previously disclosed.

The Weinstein Co.'s board announced Monday that the private equity firm Lantern Capital has made a "stalking horse" bid for the company's assets, which sets a floor for a bankruptcy auction. As part of its negotiations with New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, some of the Weinstein Co.'s employees have also been released from nondisclosure agreements. "No one should be afraid to speak out or be coerced to stay quiet," the Weinstein Co. said in a statement. "The company thanks the courageous individuals who have already come forward. Your voices have inspired a movement for change across the country and around the world." Catherine Garcia

March 19, 2018
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Executives at Facebook are at odds over how to best respond to the spread of disinformation on the platform, several current and former Facebook employees told The New York Times.

The Times reports that Alex Stamos, Facebook's chief security officer, is leaving the company by August because of the tension. Stamos has been vocal about how important it is for the public to know how Russians used Facebook to spread fake news and propaganda before the 2016 presidential election, the current and former employees said, but he's been met with resistance from other leaders, primarily on the legal and policy teams.

Stamos came to Facebook from Yahoo in 2015, and in June 2016, he had engineers start to look for suspicious Russian activity on Facebook. By November, they found evidence of Russian operatives pushing leaks from the Democratic National Committee, the Times reports, but that same month, Facebook founder and chief executive Mark Zuckerberg said it was a "pretty crazy idea" to think Russia influenced the election. More evidence was found by the spring of 2017, leading to internal arguments between Stamos, who wanted to disclose as much information as possible, and others like Elliot Schrage, vice president of communications and policy, who did not want to share anything without more "ironclad" evidence, the Times reports.

In a statement, Stamos said these are "really challenging issues," and he's had "some disagreements" with his colleagues. In response to the Times' story, he tweeted that he's "still fully engaged with my work at Facebook," and is "spending more time exploring emerging security risks and working on election security." You can read more on the backlash to Facebook's secrecy and the internal arguments at The New York Times. Catherine Garcia

March 19, 2018

The world has shooting to thank for the Eric Trump we know today.

On Monday, President Trump's middle son responded to a Fox and Friends tweet about a New Jersey high school that allegedly suspended students over a photo taken at a gun range. Shooting guns "was a big part of my youth — it kept me away from drinking/drugs, taught me safety, discipline, consentration [sic], and so many other positive life lessons," he tweeted.

Several Twitter users helpfully pointed out that shooting didn't help Trump with his spelling, and also blasted him for a 2012 hunting trip to Zimbabwe, where he was photographed alongside his brother Donald Trump Jr., holding a dead leopard. Catherine Garcia

March 19, 2018
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The teen accessories chain Claire's filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy on Monday and will close 92 stores this month and in April.

The company announced it has reached an agreement with creditors to restructure $1.9 billion in debt, and is "confident" it will emerge from bankruptcy protection in September. The chain has 1,600 locations in the United States, mostly in malls, which don't have the foot traffic they used to due to competition from big box stores and online merchants. Just remember this: You may be able to buy glittery nail polish and bejeweled headbands online, but good luck getting Alexa to pierce your ears. Catherine Garcia

March 19, 2018
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In a blow to Republicans ahead of the 2018 midterms, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected a challenge to Pennsylvania's newly drawn congressional map.

In January, the state Supreme Court ruled that the map drawn by Republicans in 2011 was gerrymandered and violated Pennsylvania's constitution, and last month, it voted 4-3 to approve a new congressional map that is less favorable to the GOP. Under the old map, Republicans regularly won 13 of the 18 districts, but with the new boundaries, Democrats are likely to pick up three or four seats. Catherine Garcia

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