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April 16, 2018
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In space, an asteroid that comes within 120,000 miles of Earth is considered a close call.

So we should feel lucky that a flying boulder whizzed past us Sunday without incident, especially considering that scientists didn't see the massive rock coming until the last minute. The asteroid, named 2018 GE3, was the size of a football field, measuring about up to 361 feet in diameter.

Because asteroids are relatively small and dark, LiveScience reports, it can be hard to predict when one will approach our planet — which is a fairly rare occurrence anyway. This most recent asteroid passed at half the moon's distance from Earth — about 119,500 miles — but the Catalina Sky Survey didn't spot it until a few hours before because the massive rock reflected so little light.

Telescopes used by NASA are generally on the lookout for much larger and potentially extremely dangerous flying objects, reports LiveScience, so it's easy for skywatchers to miss smaller asteroids that would have only a, say, mildly devastating effect on impact. So rest assured: If a truly enormous asteroid were on its way to slam into Earth, NASA would let you know.

In fact, you can mark your calendar now: An asteroid 10 times the size of 2018 GE3 is coming our way, and will approach our planet in 2036. Summer Meza

September 14, 2017

President Trump on Thursday reassured surely trembling Republicans that he "will veto" Sen. Bernie Sanders' (I-Vt.) single-payer health-care bill. Sanders introduced the legislation Wednesday with surprisingly solid backing from the Democratic caucus and to lots of media fanfare, but with almost zero chance of it ever passing Congress.

But Trump, puzzlingly, promised he would put an end to the whole affair from the Oval Office, seemingly implying he believes a bill advocating for a public health-care system paid for by higher taxes and managed at the federal level could: garner a majority of votes in the Republican-controlled House of Representatives; win 60 votes in the Senate, where the GOP controls 52 seats; and be agreed upon by both chambers, who propose it to him for a signature.

Either that, or he needs a little civics refresher, which we've provided below. Kimberly Alters

May 10, 2017
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Rest easy, America: President Trump is "small potatoes compared to Nazi Germany." At a town hall Tuesday night shortly after Trump fired FBI Director James Comey, House Freedom Caucus member Rep. Tom Garrett (R-Va.) attempted to soothe his constituents by pointing to a moment in history that was worse than Trump's presidency. "America has overcome amazing challenges that Donald Trump, as frightening as he is to some people, small potatoes compared to Nazi Germany," Garrett said.

When constituents met that remark with jeers, Garrett doubled down. "So he's worse?" Garrett said, literally asking the crowd if they'd rank America's commander-in-chief as greater cause for alarm than the Third Reich. Garrett pointed out people were worried about former President Barack Obama too, and promised that, no matter what, "this great nation will continue to move forward by virtue of the collective of American people."

Feel better now? Becca Stanek

April 28, 2017
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Congress on Friday passed a stopgap spending bill, keeping the government funded through May 5 and dodging a looming government shutdown on President Trump's 100th day in office Saturday. The spending extension easily passed the House, 382-30, and it passed the Senate in a voice vote. The bill will now go to Trump's desk.

Lawmakers were staring down a deadline of Friday at midnight to either pass a spending bill or see a partial government shutdown. Now that the stopgap bill has passed Congress, legislators on Capitol Hill will have an additional week to negotiate a $1 trillion spending bill financing government agencies through the end of the federal government's fiscal year. Becca Stanek

December 2, 2016

For anyone concerned about President-elect Donald Trump's grasp on the Constitution, House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) is already on the case. When asked about Trump's understanding of the differences between running a country and a business empire, Ryan said he has talked to Trump "extensively" about the founding document, particularly the section on the separation of powers. "We've talked about the Constitution, Article 1 on the Constitution, the separation of powers," Ryan said in an excerpt of a 60 Minutes interview set to air Sunday. "He feels very strongly, actually, that under President Obama's watch, he stripped a lot of power away from the Constitution, away from the legislative branch of government, and we want to reset the balance of power so that people and the Constitution are rightfully restored."

Trump's handle on the Constitution has been questioned on several occasions, such as when he said in July that he supported Article 12 of the Constitution. The Constitution has just seven articles.

You can catch Ryan's full 60 Minutes interview on Sunday at 7 p.m. ET. In the meantime, watch the excerpt below. Becca Stanek

September 28, 2016
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The Senate on Wednesday averted a government shutdown with the passage of a spending bill that will keep the government funded through Dec. 9. The bill, which pledges $1.1 billion to fight the Zika virus and $500 million in flood relief to Louisiana, passed in a 72-26 vote. It will next move to the House, where it's expected to be approved, and will then hit President Obama's desk.

Senate Democrats initially blocked the measure Tuesday because it did not include aid for the water contamination crisis in Flint, Michigan; however, the bill moved forward Wednesday after Republicans agreed Tuesday night to consider Flint aid in a future measure, to come after the presidential election.

Many government agencies were set to run out of funding Friday, as the fiscal year ends at midnight Oct. 1. With the stop-gap bill, such a shutdown is avoided. Becca Stanek